K-9 Freckles ~ A Senior Beagle’s Unnecessary Death…

K-9 Freckles ~ A Senior Beagle’s Unnecessary Death…

Okaloosa Correctional Institution is located in Crestview Florida, which is part of Okaloosa County and under the direct supervision of the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office. The correctional facility can house approximately 900 inmates and employs a variety of staff including K9s. One of them was K-9 Freckles, an 11-year-old beagle who, according to the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office, was “a great dog with a great nose who set the bar high for her counterparts.”

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Law enforcement had been looking for an alleged car thief, Eric Russell, since May 7, 2017, when he fled after officers attempted to pull him over for a traffic stop. On May 11 several agencies along with K9s took part in the manhunt for Russell. The OCSO utilized Okaloosa Correctional K-9 Freckles in the search and tragically she died. On their Facebook page, the OCSO said Freckles “either overheated or suffered a heart attack“.

Okaloosa County is located in the Northeast part of Florida close to the Alabama border. The weather on May 11 was approximately 85 degrees.

The Walton County Sheriff’s Office announced  they captured Eric Russell around 10 pm that same night. 

Beagles are mostly used in airports, harbors and correctional facilities to sniff out narcotics and any illegal substances. Because of their size, they are easy to lift into areas which a person otherwise can’t access. They can also be fast, swift and great for tracking. Beagles are also used as cadaver dogs to sniff out bodies or substances.

I kept reading comments by the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office that K-9 Freckles died “doing what she loved best”. On their Facebook page, where you can also view K-9 Freckles procession, many people posted that Eric Russell killed K-9 Freckles. This really bothered me for several reasons. She was 11- years old and as seen in this photo, a bit overweight.

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I started to do a bit of research and learned that the average life expectancy of a beagle is 12 to 15 years, with a median of 13.5 years. In this informative article by the National Beagle Club, a beagle is considered a senior at age 7. This also addresses the problems seniors develop such as the decrease in their ability to regulate their body temperature, arthritis, and excess weight. Still curious, I emailed a long time handler friend and asked his opinion. He was kind enough to allow me to use it in my post as long as I removed any personal information.

Honestly, I’ve only seen them used as narcotic dogs and they excel at it. Beagles can be used to track but it’s not very realistic to have them actively track in a manhunt despite their great noses. Scenario – we’re tracking a suspect that may or may not be armed and he runs into the woods ok? The beagle would be able to track him fine but when he located the suspect what could the beagle do for me? Whereas if I’m using a Mal or GSD whose also certified in tracking, I can send him in on the suspect. Chances are he would comply more with what I’m saying with an aggressive sounding/looking Mal or GSD standing there as opposed to a beagle. And if the suspect resisted, a Mal or GSD could easily subdue him where a beagle can’t.

I reached the conclusion that there was NO excuse for this. This senior K9 officer was used to track a man who stole “Donnie’s truck” (found in one of the comments on the Facebook page) among other vehicles.  K-9 Freckles was a “jail dog” and as such would have been used to detect contraband inside the facility. I  don’t understand why they felt the need to utilize her for a car thief. Eric Russell wasn’t being hunted because of a violent crime such as rape or murder so why risk the health of a senior dog? Part of the responsibility that goes with being a K9 handler is to use common sense when utilizing them. One of the biggest considerations while working with a K9 is their health, fitness, and welfare. According to the National Police Dog Foundation, the average retirement age is approximately 10 years which is contingent on their health status. 

Chances are OSI has younger German Shepherds or Belgian Malinois to handle out of control inmates, riots and so forth. At age 11 K-9 Freckles should have been retired or strictly limited to inside the jail. Instead, she ran after a car thief till she died. Despite the Facebook posts calling K-9 Freckle’s death a LODD (line of duty death), I don’t see it that way. She died because either her handler or someone within the OCSO made the decision to take an 11-year-old dog carrying extra pounds on a small frame and have her track a car thief in 85-degree weather. This was not a line of duty death nor a death doing something she loved. It was a grievous and senseless death due to a poor decision and complete lack of judgment by whoever was in charge of K-9 Freckles. 

Several Florida handlers have made heinous blunders the past few years resulting in the death of their dogs. Even with the death of K-9 Freckles, there are more to come for the Summer of 2017.

K-9 Freckles

EOW  May 11, 2017

Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office FL

She has gone home to rest for the final time

“Officer  Kilo Freckles is 10-42 … Good Girl Freckles”

K9

The first to sense the hostility of a suspect,
The first to react to protect his master.
The first to enter where danger lurks.
The first to detect the hidden intruder.
The first to take action against violence.
The first to sense his master’s joy.
The first to know his master’s sorrow or fear.
The first to give his life in defense of his master.
The last to be forgotten by those who work with others like him.
They know him as a “Partner,” not just an animal.

 

💙Next up ~ another Florida K9 dies while trapped in a hot car🖤

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maine: The Way Life Should Be ~ NOT…

Maine: The Way Life Should Be ~ NOT…

The hour is quite late so I’m deviating from my normal style of posting because I am so disturbed by what I heard on the news as I walked past the television that I am unable to rest. I realized after hearing the story on WGME 13, a CBS affiliate station covering Maine, that I live in a state where the very agencies created to help those in need often turn a blind eye ~for months. While this story may not be a graphic murder scene or the never-ending election debates, it nonetheless is truly unconscionable especially now, in the season of giving, kindness and faith.

The cover photo for this post is one of the first things one sees upon entering the state. Similar signs dot the major highways as well as secondary roads. I even photographed a weather worn sign on the Appalachian Trail in 2015.

I think the meaning behind the slogan is that life in Maine is perfect and perhaps to some it is. I personally find it less than ideal and honestly cannot wait to leave. The state and I have, shall I say, a mutual dislike for each other. I’ve grown weary of the never-ending sound of gunfire, of chasing hunters off my clearly marked property every year, of picking up empty beer cans, burned out firecrackers and an occasional condom from my private river area. Tired of making a doctor’s appointment only to be scheduled 4-7 months out. I’m done.

And what news report cold have angered me so much you wonder? Ir was a story of two women actually. One is a victim and the other the  CEO of KVCAP a non-profit organization that helps “hundreds of thousands of residents overcome the challenges of poverty”.

On your left is Peggy Lane, a homeowner in Central Maine who has been without heat since the beginning of November because her furnace broke and she doesn’t have the money to get a new one. Peggy has been living in extreme cold along with her small dog and her cat. Tonight the temperature is well below zero and the coldest on record for this part of December in 27 years. Peggy and her faithful companions have been making do with a small space heater and many layers of clothing and coats. On the left is Suzanne Walsh .CEO of  KVCAP. Her organization is aware of Peggy’s dire situation but recently advised Peggy  that they have to put her repair out for bid first. before they can help her due to federal regulations bah blah blah.

In desperation Peggy reached out to WGME’s I Team and today reporter Jon Crisos visited her. Here is the story:

“I’m just so cold” — woman without heat for weeks turns to I-Team for help

by Jon Chrisos

Friday, December 16th 2016

WEST GARDINER (WGME) — On this coldest day of the season, a West Gardiner woman doesn’t have any heat. Peggy Lane has been living in the cold in her home for more than a month now and it’s all because of a fight over her boiler. “It’s been a nightmare, it’s just been a complete nightmare,” Lane said.  As the wind whips outside, frost covers the windows of her home. “I’m really cold, and I’m miserable, but I’m just trying to get through this the best I can because I know people have it worse than I do,” Lane said. She said she hasn’t had any heat since early November when her boiler cracked and leaked all over the basement. Since then she’s been trying to get low-income assistance to replace it. “Obviously I do not have the money or I would put the boiler in,” Lane said.

She got a letter Thursday from KVCAP, which administers federal funding, telling her they could help, but would have to put the project out to bid.

“I’m just so cold. People shouldn’t live like this; it’s not right,” she said.

Lane called the CBS 13 On Your Side I-Team to see if we could help.

We asked KVCAP if there’s a process for emergency heating assistance.

KVCAP CEO Suzanne Walsh called back to explain based on funding rules, they’re required to get the lowest price for every project.

“We have to operate under very strict guidelines because we’re ambassadors of federal funds,” Walsh said.  However, after talking with Maine Housing, she said they’ll now work to expedite the bid process and get the boiler replaced.

“We definitely want to work the homeowner and make sure she is warm and safe,” Walsh said.  KVCAP also told us they’d send over some larger space heaters and would start getting bids Friday.

If you need heat help, Maine Housing suggests you apply for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP).

As of Friday, we’re told 32,700 applications have been processed in Maine and the average benefit so far this heating season is $732.

 

This is truly one of the saddest stories I have heard in many a year. It’s also inexcusable.